Dave Grohl's Guitars and Gear

Published : - Author : Dan Kopilovic

Summary of Dave Grohl’s gear

What guitar does Dave Grohl play?

Dave Grohl plays a 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez – a guitar that he described as the “sound of the Foo Fighters“. He used this Gibson on all of Foo Fighters’ albums, although of course not necessarily on all of the songs. Also, his current signature model (the blue guitar that Dave plays most often nowadays), the Gibson Dave Grohl Signature DG-335, is based heavily on Dave’s original Trini Lopez.

The original 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez on the left that Dave describes as the sound of the Foo Fighters. On the right is Dave playing his signature Gibson DG-335, which is based on the Trini Lopez.
The original 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez on the left that Dave describes as the sound of the Foo Fighters. On the right is Dave playing his signature Gibson DG-335, which is based on the Trini Lopez. Photo: Raph_PH/Flickr

Aside from that guitar, which he almost never uses live but rather keeps safe at his studio, Dave Grohl used a variety of Gibson Les Pauls, Explorers, SGs, and RD Standards. Most notably, he used a tobacco Les Paul Standard to record Foo Fighters’ debut album which was released in 1995. But, at some point after that he decided to repaint this guitar, never finished the project, and the guitar is now sitting in storage halfway done.

It’s also important to mention that he used a 1970s Gibson RD Standard in tobacco burst extensively on Foo Fighters’ second album, The Colour and the Shape. So likely, this guitar ended up on some of the band’s biggest songs like “Everlong” and “My Hero”.

As far as acoustic guitars, Dave doesn’t seem to have such a strict preference as with his electrics. He was seen using a variety of different Taylors, a Martin D-18, and a Gibson Elvis Presley Dove – which seems to be his current main acoustic guitar.

Gibson Elvis Presley Dove - acoustic guitar that Dave Grohl has been using recently.
Gibson Elvis Presley Dove – acoustic guitar that Dave Grohl has been using recently.

What amp does Dave Grohl use?

Dave Grohl uses a Vox AC30 amp for clean sounds and a Mesa Boogie Rectifier amp for his dirty tones. This isn’t his amp rig all the time, but it’s the one he’s best known for. He occasionally also used Fender Tone Masters as well as Custom Guitar Amplifiers (that’s the actual brand name, yes).

What Strings and Picks does Dave use?

For strings, Dave uses the D’Addario EXL115, and for picks, he seems to like the Dunlop .71mm Gator Grips.

The Dunlop .71mm Gator Grip guitar picks that Dave used for the majority of his career.
The Dunlop .71mm Gator Grip guitar picks that Dave used for the majority of his career.

This gear list is a result of years of research and constant updates. It's a hobby project with the goal to eventually have the most complete and thorough gear list on the web - but that is only achievable with your help!

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List of Guitars, Amps, Effects, and Accessories used by Dave Grohl

Dave Grohl's Electric Guitars

  • 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez

    Dave Grohl’s 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez

    This is Dave’s main guitar with Foo Fighters, the one he used to record most of the band’s songs. It was also used as a basis for his current stage guitar, the Gibson Dave Grohl signature model.

    Dave with his most prized possession - a 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez
    Dave with his most prized possession – a 1967 Gibson Trini Lopez

    According to Dave, he bought this guitar around 1992, while he was still a member of Nirvana.

    1991
  • Gibson Les Paul (Tobacco Burst)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Les Paul (Tobacco Burst)

    Dave was seen playing this guitar in the early days of Foo Fighters, including on their first ever gig, played on February 19th, 1995 in downtown Seattle. According to Dave (see quote at the bottom of the page), he used this guitar to record the Foo Fighters’ first album, released in 1995.

    Foo Fighters' first gig, February 1995.
    Foo Fighters’ first gig, February 1995.

    He was also photographed with the guitar at The Fillmore in San Francisco, California on July 26, 1995, and in 1997 at the Pukkelpop Festival in Hasselt, Belgium. However, since Foo Fighters played a lot of gigs between 95 and 97, it’s very likely that Dave used the guitar extensively during that period, as one of his main ones. He probably rotated between a couple of different Les Pauls, SGs, and Explorers.

    Embed from Getty Images

    1995
  • 1990s Gibson Explorer

    Dave Grohl’s 1990 Gibson Explorer

    This was one of Dave’s main guitars in the early days and probably the longest-running among them. The first video footage of him using the guitar dates to the Brixton Academy gig played on November 15, 1995.

    Foo Fighters, Brixton 1995

    As this was very soon after the release of Foo Fighters’ first album, it could be that the guitar was acquired just before the tour, and used as his main touring guitar.

    I had a Gibson Explorer for a long time. I don’t know anything about guitars. If it sounds good when you play it, play it.

    Classic interview: Josh Homme, Dave Grohl and Alain Johannes talk Them Crooked Vultures and affordable gear

    1995
  • Gibson Les Paul Custom (White)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Les Paul Custom (Alpine White)

    This is one of the guitars that Dave used in the early days of Foo Fighters, from around 1995 to 1997. It was seen in numerous concerts, including at the Virgin Megastore, New York, 1996, Phoenix Festival in 1996, and the Bizarre Festival in 1997 – just to name a few.

    Dave with the blonde Les Paul, Bizarre Festival 1997
    Dave with the blonde Les Paul, Bizarre Festival 1997

    Based on the appearances, the guitar is a Gibson Les Paul Custom. This can be deducted from the large block fretboard inlays and the split diamond headstock inlay, which are features of an LP Custom.

    2
    1996
  • Gibson Les Paul Custom (Black)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Les Paul Custom (Black)

    This is another guitar used by Dave on tours in the early days of Foo Fighters, up until the late 90s. Among others, it was used parallel with another Les Paul Custom, which could indicate that the two guitars were purchased together. Some sources online even claim that this is indeed the case and that they are both 1991 models, but none of them share their sources, so it could be just another internet tale copied from one site to another.

    Dave playing the black Les Paul Custom, Foo-Fighters at Reading Festival 1998
    Dave playing the black Les Paul Custom, Foo-Fighters at Reading Festival 1998
    1996
  • 1970s Gibson RD Standard (Tobacco Burst)

    Dave Grohl’s 1970s Gibson RD Standard (Tobacco Burst)

    This is another guitar that Dave used in the early days of Foo Fighters, and not much is known about it. As an interesting note, Krist Novoselic used to use RD bass guitars in Nirvana, but Dave explained that he discovered the guitar on his own and that it wasn’t necessarily an influence from Krist.

    I had an RD phase [Gibson RD Artist]. I was really into RDs for a while. [Krist Novoselic] had RD and Grabber basses. But I think what happened was that I saw one in a store and I thought, Wow this thing weighs 40 pounds! I had a Gibson Explorer for a long time. I don’t know anything about guitars. If it sounds good when you play it, play it.

    Classic interview: Josh Homme, Dave Grohl and Alain Johannes talk Them Crooked Vultures and affordable gear

    Dave playing a Gibson RD Standard, June 15, 1996, Tibetan Freedom Concert
    Dave playing a Gibson RD Standard, June 15, 1996, Tibetan Freedom Concert
    1
    1996
  • Gretsch 6125 (Smoke Green)

    Dave Grohl’s Gretsch 6125 (Smoke Green)

    Dave was seen playing this guitar during the 1997 Rockpalast/Bizarre Festival concert. He used it to play Doll, See You, and For all the Cows.

    As far as why he picked up the guitar for this one particular occasion (he didn’t seem to use it anywhere else) is unknown. If you happen to know the backstory, be sure to leave a comment below.

    Dave playing a Gretsch, 1997, Rockpalast, Bizarre Festival
    1997
  • Gibson SG Custom (White)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson SG Custom (White)

    Dave was seen using this guitar around 1997, most notably at the Bizarre Festival (photo below), and on the television show “Later… with Jools Holland”.

    Dave Grohl playing a white Gibson SG Custom at Bizzare Festival, 1997.
    Dave Grohl playing a white Gibson SG Custom at Bizzare Festival, 1997.

    Unfortunately, not much is known about this guitar. From the looks of it, it’s an older SG Custom model, with three pickups, and a stop-tail bridge. Based on the black knobs, and the black pickguard, it’s most likely a 70s model.

    But, as far as where Dave got it, and where it disappeared in the late 90s, that’s completely a mystery.

    1
    1997
  • 1970s Telecaster Custom

    Dave Grohl’s 1970s Telecaster Custom

    Dave started using this guitar following the release of There Is Nothing Left to Lose in 1999. Apparently, he used a Telecaster on some of the songs from that album, so it would make sense that he would take one tour – even though this was quite a change. Up until that point he used Gibsons basically exclusively.

    Guitar-wise, [on There Is Nothing Left to Lose] I used my Gibson Trini Lopez, a Fender Telecaster, a Gretsch Duo-Jet, some Les Pauls, Explorers, and RD Artists.

    Rockin’ Grohl Hoochie Foo – Guitar One 1999

    Dave with the Telecaster, The 10:30 Slot, 1999
    1999
  • Gretsch G6128T Duo-Jet

    Dave Grohl’s 1990s Gretsch G6128T Duo-Jet

    According to Dave, he used a Gretsch Duo-Jet on the Foo Fighter’s 1999 album There Is Nothing Left to Lose.

    Guitar-wise, I used my Gibson Trini Lopez, a Fender Telecaster, a Gretsch Duo-Jet, some Les Pauls, Explorers, and RD Artists.

    Rockin’ Grohl Hoochie Foo – Guitar One 1999

    Specifically, he mentioned using the guitar for the chorus on the song “Headwires”.

    The main riff [on Headwires] is an Explorer playing through the Memory Man and the Vox, and the harmonics were done with the same setup. The choruses are the Duo Jet running through a Rat and the Vox. The high, picking part in the middle eight is an SG through the Memory Man.

    Dave Grohl’s No Fuzz Zone – Guitar Player 1999

    1999
  • Ampeg Dan Armstrong Plexiglass

    Dave Grohl’s Ampeg Dan Armstrong Lucite Guitar

    This was Dave’s main guitar during the One by One Tour (2002–2003), and he used it almost exclusively during that period. It was also used on a few occasions in 2004/05, but at that point, a lot of other guitars were also in the mix.

    Dave playing the Ampeg Dan Armstrong guitar. Studio 2 (CD:UK) 2002
    Dave playing the Ampeg Dan Armstrong guitar. Studio 2 (CD:UK) 2002

    This guitar model was made famous mainly by Keith Richard of the Rolling Stones, who used one starting from 1969. Dave’s guitar is from around that same period, since Ampeg only produced the model for three years, from 1969 to 1971.

    4
    2002
  • Gibson Firebird Studio (Black)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Firebird Studio (Black)

    This Gibson Firebird was one of Dave’s main touring guitars around 2005/2006, and he continued using it occasionally in 2007/08. He was seen playing it on numerous occasions, but most notably at the Reading Festival in 2005, and Isle of Wight in 2006.

    Dave Grohl playing a black Gibson Firebird guitar at Isle of Wight music festival, 2006.
    Dave Grohl playing a black Gibson Firebird guitar at Isle of Wight music festival, 2006.

    Based on the looks, the guitar was a Gibson Firebird Studio model, since it has simple dot fretboard inlays and a single-ply pickguard.

    The guitar was equipped with Gibsons’ 490R and 498T humbuckers (if he kept it stock), it had a Tune-o-Matic bridge, Sa topbar tailpiece, and Grover tuners.

    2004
  • Gibson Firebird Studio (White)

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Firebird Studio (White)

    This Gibson Firebird Studio seemed to have been a backup for Dave’s black Firebird around 2005/06. Based on the footage available, it seems that the white was used a lot less than the black one, therefore the assumption that it was just a backup. Also, the black Firebird made it into 2007/08, while the white one was nowhere to be seen at that point.

    Dave playing the white Gibson Firebird at Isle of Wight, 2006.
    Dave playing the white Gibson Firebird at Isle of Wight, 2006.

    Unfortunately, not much is known about the guitar, aside from what can be deducted from the photos.

    It’s a 2000s Firebird Studio, obviously, finished in white. The pickups in it, assuming the guitar is stock, are the Gibson 490R and 498T humbuckers.

    2005
  • Gibson Dave Grohl Signature DG-335

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Dave Grohl Signature DG-335

    This has been Dave’s main guitar ever since it has been introduced by Gibson in 2007. The guitar is basically a Gibson Trini Lopez with Dave’s own touches on it, which makes sense since he said numerous times that the Trini Lopez is his favorite guitar of all time.

    Dave playing his DG-335 signature guitar from Gibson.
    Dave playing his DG-335 signature guitar from Gibson.

    The DG-335 features a semi-hollow-body design made of maple and a mahogany neck with a rosewood fretboard. The f-holes, fretboard inlays, and headstock shape were all taken directly from the Trini Lopez model.

    2007

Dave Grohl's Acoustic Guitars

  • Taylor 410

    Dave Grohl’s 1990s Taylor 410

    Dave used this guitar during the set that the band did for Howard Stern Show in May 2000.

    Dave playing the guitar at the Howard Stern studio.
    Dave playing the guitar at the Howard Stern studio.

    Based on the appearances, this is a 410 model from Taylor. This is based on the rosette, which appears to have three rings, with the middle one being bright white. Also, the binding around the fretboard seems to be typical to this model, particularly to the guitar made in the late 90s.

    2000
  • Taylor 814-CE

    Dave Grohl’s Taylor 814-CE Acoustic Guitar

    Dave was seen playing this guitar on a number of occasions in the early 2000s, most notably at the Bridge Benefit Concerts, and at the AT&T Acoustic Series gig.

    Dave Grohl playing a Taylor 814-CE acoustic guitar.
    Dave with the guitar during the AT&T acoustic gig.

    The 814-CE is among Taylor’s top-of-the-line models. Dave’s guitar was made likely in the late 90s or 2000, and it differs a little when compared to the modern version. The newer models have different inlays, they often come with a small arm rest against the top edge.

    2000
  • Martin D-18

    Dave Grohl’s Martin D-18

    Dave used this guitar most famously to play a cover of Elton John’s Tiny Dancer on February 16, 2001, on The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn.

    Based on the appearances, this was a Martin D-18 model, since it doesn’t appear to have white binding around the side edges.

    It’s however unknown whether this was actually Dave’s guitar, or whether it was provided to him by the TV staff.

    2
    2001
  • Gibson Elvis Presley Dove

    Dave Grohl’s Gibson Elvis Presley Dove

    This is the acoustic guitar that Dave uses most often in recent years. He started using it around 2005 (see video at the bottom) and continues using it to this day. He owns more than just one of these guitars, but it is unknown whether he has a favorite among them.

    Dave with one of his Gibson Elvis Presley Dove guitars.

    The Gibson Elvis Presley Dove is a model based on Elvis Presley’s 1969 Gibson Dove acoustic guitar that he used in the early 70s. The guitar was a gift from his father, Vernon Presley. In 1975, Elvis famously handed the guitar mid-performance to an astonished audience member at a concert in Asheville, North Carolina.

    2005

Dave Grohl's Amps

  • Vox AC30

    Dave Grohl’s Vox AC30 Amp

    This has been Dave’s main amp for many years, starting from the early days of Foo Fighters. Most often, he used it for the clean sounds, while using Mesa Boogies or other amps for the dirty tones.

    As a an example of specific use, the amp was featured extensively on the There Is Nothing Left to Lose (1999).

    We focused on not using too many distortion pedals, and went for a cleaner, fatter, more natural overdrive. We used a Vox AC30 for pretty much everything on the record, tweaking the sound so that it broke up nicely when played loud.

    Sometimes we’d double a track using an old Pro Co Rat, and then hard-pan the parts so that a super-distorted guitar was in the left channel and a grindy guitar was in the right. Then we’d sprinkle in lots of clean guitar overdubs.

    Dave Grohl’s No Fuzz Zone, Guitar Player 1999

    In the most recent years, Dave’s guitar tech simplified the rig somewhat, as explained in the interview below.

    1995
  • Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier

    Dave Grohl’s Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier

    Apparently, this was one of the amps that were heavily utilized on the Foo Fighters’ second album The Colour and the Shape (1997). This information can be deducted from Dave’s quote below – in which he talked about the amps used on the band’s third album.

    We also used a MESA/Boogie Maverick–it’s a little head. But we tried to stay away from the MESA/Boogie Dual or Triple Rectifier sound because we did that on the last record a lot.

    Rockin’ Grohl Hoochie Foo – Guitar One 1999

    This of course means that some of the band’s biggest hits including Everlong, My Hero, and Monkey Wrench were all recorded on Mesa/Boogie Dual/Triple Rectifier amps – or at least the parts of the dongs that are heavy/distorted. The clean parts were likely done on a Vox AC30.

    The Foo Fighters Dave Grohl guitar amp setup at Bizarre Festival 2000.
    The band’s guitar amp setup at Bizarre Festival 2000. Two Mesa/Boogie Dual, and two Vox AC30 (second is to the right of Dave).
    1996
  • Mesa/Boogie Road King

    Dave Grohl’s Mesa/Boogie Road King Amp

    This seems to be the amp that replaced most of Dave’s amps around the early 2000s and remains his main stage amp up until the 2010s.

    In the earlier years, it sounds like Dave would use a Vox AC30 for clean sound, and a separate amp for dirty sound – usually a Mesa Boogie of some sort. At some point, his guitar tech decided to simplify things and replaced the whole setup with a couple of Mesa Boogie Road Kings. So, now they are used for both the clean and dirty sounds – at least when playing live.

    I got rid of the extra amps. Before, when he [Grohl] wanted a cleaner sound, the A/B box would get a signal from the Vox AC30, which sounded great. When he wanted a dirty sound, he would go to the Mesa Boogie, and there was a Marshall that was in the mix every once in a while.

    I got rid of that and I bought a three-channel amp at the time, and now we use four-channel amps, so I can get a wide range of tones and sounds. I like the Mesa Boogie Road Kings because 1) they sound good, and 2) they’re bullet-proof.

    Joe Beebe: Dave Grohl’s Guitar Tech (link offline)

    Dave Grohl's amp setup at Wembley 2008 concert.
    Dave’s amp setup at Wembley 2008. Mesa/Boogie Road King is seen on the bottom left.
    2000
  • Fender Tone Master

    Dave Grohl’s Fender Tone Master Amp

    Dave apparently used these amps in his live setup after the release of Wasting Light in 2011, primarily for smaller venues.

    There was a point, and this was again right after we’ve made Wasting Light (2011) and we were rehearsing getting ready to tour, and pretty much everybody had been playing Boogies for years. I remember the first rehearsals for Wasting Light, everybody showed up with an entirely different amp – Dave showed up with those Tone Masters, and Custom Audio amps.

    Chris Shiflett Answers Questions Fans Submitted Through Facebook

    2011
  • Custom Audio Amplifiers 100W

    Dave Grohl’s Custom Audio Amplifiers 100W

    Dave used these amps in his live setup around the time of the release of Wasting Light in 2011.

    There was a point, and this was again right after we’ve made Wasting Light (2011) and we were rehearsing getting ready to tour, and pretty much everybody had been playing Boogies for years. I remember the first rehearsals for Wasting Light, everybody showed up with an entirely different amp – Dave showed up with those Tone Masters, and Custom Audio amps.

    Chris Shiflett Answers Questions Fans Submitted Through Facebook

    2011

Dave Grohl's Effects

  • Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man

    Dave Grohl’s Electro-Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man Analog Chorus/Echo/Delay

    Dave mentioned using this effect on Foo Fighter’s 1999 album There’s Nothing Left to Lose.

    The main riff [on Headwires] is an Explorer playing through the Memory Man and the Vox, and the harmonics were done with the same setup. The choruses are the Duo Jet running through a Rat and the Vox. The high, picking part in the middle eight is an SG through the Memory Man.

    Dave Grohl’s No Fuzz Zone – Guitar Player 1999

    1999
  • Dunlop Heil Talkbox

    Dave Grohl’s Dunlop Heil Talkbox

    Dave used a Dunlop Heil Talkbox on the song “Generator” from the Foo Fighter’s 1999 album There Is Nothing Left to Lose.

    Most of the record was done with a Vox AC-30, with effects pedals like a Uni-Vibe or a Memory Man, or old BOSS delay pedals, Rat distortion pedals, Electro-Harmonix pedals, or Octave Fuzzes. I used a Talk Box on “Generator.”

    Rockin’ Grohl Hoochie Foo – Guitar One 1999

    1999
  • ProCo RAT Distortion

    Dave Grohl’s ProCo RAT Distortion

    This seems to be one of Dave’s main distortion pedals, although it’s hard to find information on the specific uses.

    He did mention in an interview regarding the 1999 album There Is Nothing Left to Lose that he used a ProCo RAT a lot combined with a Vox AC30 amp on specific songs like Stacked Actors, but as said, these statements regarding specific uses are rare.

    I actually tuned my low E string down to A, so it was flopping all over the place. That’s the Rat pedal through the Vox. [Engineer} Adam Kaspar recorded the last Soundgarden record, and he had worked with R.E.M., so he was good with those Vox and Maverick amps–I had never used them before. So we were all really into the Vox AC-30 with the Rat pedal because it sounded badass. It sounded warm and kind of fucked up, not like the razor-sharp distortion of a Rectifier. It was something a little fatter, a little warmer, and a little more believable.

    Rockin’ Grohl Hoochie Foo – Guitar One 1999

    1999
  • Boss Digital Delay DD-3

    Dave Grohl’s Boss Digital Delay DD-3

    Dave used this pedal on his most recent pedalboard, a photo of which was published on Reddit in 2021. There are also photos of his pedalboard dating to earlier years, all of which seem to feature this pedal.

    It’s very hard to tell which version of the Boss Digital Delay this is, because the differences between let’s say a DD-3 and a DD-8 are very subtle, at least visually. But, based on the fact that the “A” and “B” labels don’t seem to be present next to the input/output marks, this is likely a DD-3.

    Dave Grohl’s pedalboard, 2021.

    As far as usage, obviously, one of the delays is dedicated to playing the song “Aurora” since it’s clearly labeled for that purpose. The other pedal could is probably the “all purpose” delay, and is used as needed.

    2019
  • MXR Phase 90 

    Dave Grohl’s MXR Phase 90 

    This is one of the few pedals that were actually photographed on Dave’s pedalboard at one point, aside from the Boss TU tuner and a delay pedal. However, it’s hard to tell whether he actually ever uses it, aside from on the song “Breakout”.

    Dave Grohl’s pedalboard in 2012. Photo credit: Reddit.com

    If you happen to come across any interview where Dave talks about this pedal, or you have any knowledge of when he used it, please be sure to leave a comment below

    2020
  • Xotic EP Booster

    Dave Grohl’s Xotic EP Booster

    This pedal was seen on Dave’s pedalboard in 2021. The pedal is basically a replica of the legendary EP-3 echo which many of the old-school guitarists used as a pre-amp. It basically just gives a little bit of volume boost to the signal.

    Dave’s pedalboard in 2012, the EP booster is in the middle left. Photo credit: Reddit.com
    2021

Dave Grohl's Strings

  • D’Addario EXL115

    Dave Grohl’s D’Addario EXL115 Electric Guitar Strings

    According to Dave’s guitar tech, Joe Beebe, Dave uses the D’Addario EXL115 strings on his electric guitars, with some modifications. Joe puts heavier strings on the top for Dave, with .42 for the A-string and .60 for the E, compared to .038 and .049 respectively on the original EXL115 set.

    I use D’Addario EXL 115s, but I throw the bottom two strings away and I replace them with a .42 for the A-string and a .60 for the E-string.

    He is such a hard player; he’s a chainsaw live! He was breaking strings a lot, so I had to beef up the gauges a bunch and I also have to raise the action on him, otherwise he’s hitting the strings so hard all it would do is buzz all day long!

    Joe Beebe – Performing-Musician.com (page is offline now)

    1995

Dave Grohl's Accessories

  • Dunlop .71mm Gator Grip Picks

    Dave Grohl’s Dunlop .71mm Gator Grip Picks

    This is the pick that Dave used in the early days, during the 90s. In the later years, Dunlop started making custom picks with the Foo Fighters logo printed on them, but they were essentially the same.

    The Gator Grip pick is a special type of pick developed by Dunlop, with the goal to increase the grip when compared to regular smooth picks. They achieved this by using a rough matte surface, which Dave apparently loves.

    Dunlop .71mm Gator Grip Picks seen on Dave’s mic stand, circa 1995.

    It’s worth noting that on some footage, the picks appear to have a different, darker purple color. But, it seems that this is just Dunlop not sticking to one particular color, as you can find .71mms in various shades of purple it seems.

    1995

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